Tag Archives: recipe

Desert in a cup

6 Apr

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Chicken Soup For The Soul

12 Sep
Grandma always said, “Chicken soup is good for you!”
When it starts to get colder and the weather is dreary and dark,  it makes for a nice setting to make a large batch of chicken broth.Cooking up a batch of broth always warms the entire house with a very nice aroma that lasts all day long as I slowly cook the broth on the stove for hours on end. Chicken broth is nice to have around – it’s used in a wide variety of recipes for soups and sauces that we make.

I like to make a big batch of broth and freeze it in small containers and jars to have on hand whenever a recipe calls for it. Sure I can (and do) use the packaged broth and the cubes to make broth, but to me, having home made broth is the absolute best, and its fun to make.
Chicken broth is good to make when you have left over chicken or turkey bones and parts from a prior dinner – why waste them? Make a good batch of chicken broth and you can get more bang for your buck out of your poultry and you’ll have some home made chicken broth on hand when you need it.
I found that occasionally the supermarkets have chicken on sale and you can get a whole chicken or parts (thighs etc 4-5lbs) for around $5 or $6 dollars, which will make about 5 quarts of broth.
My favorite, and what I consider a good basic recipe, is the one by Alton Brown. It’s got a good foundation and I like his ideas for techniques to get the most out of all the flavors.
Grab a very large pot that can hold 2 gallons of water, and a steamer basket
Here’s the recipe which can be found on the Food Network website

Ingredients

4 pounds chicken carcasses, including necks and backs

1 large onion, quartered

4 carrots, peeled and cut in 1/2

4 ribs celery, cut in 1/2

1 leek, white part only, cut in 1/2 lengthwise

10 sprigs fresh thyme

10 sprigs fresh parsley with stems

2 bay leaves

8 to 10 peppercorns

2 whole cloves garlic, peeled

2 gallons cold water

Directions

Place chicken, vegetables, and herbs and spices in 12-quart stockpot. Set opened steamer basket directly on ingredients in pot and pour over water. Cook on high heat until you begin to see bubbles break through the surface of the liquid. Turn heat down to medium low so that stock maintains low, gentle simmer. Skim the scum from the stock with a spoon or fine mesh strainer every 10 to 15 minutes for the first hour of cooking and twice each hour for the next 2 hours. Add hot water as needed to keep bones and vegetables submerged. Simmer uncovered for 6 to 8 hours.

Strain stock through a fine mesh strainer into another large stockpot or heatproof container discarding the solids. Cool immediately in large cooler of ice or a sink full of ice water to below 40 degrees. Place in refrigerator overnight. Remove solidified fat from surface of liquid and store in container with lid in refrigerator for 2 to 3 days or in freezer for up to 3 months. Prior to use, bring to boil for 2 minutes.

Use as a base for soups and sauces.

August Food Holidays to Celebrate!

2 Aug

August Food Holidays

It’s amazing how many wild, crazy and cool food holidays there are.  Did you know  there is a National Ice Cream Day? (BTW, it’s today!) Did you know there was a National Chocolate Pecan Pie Day? And with dozens of other national food holidays in the month of August, you can literally celebrate a different dish every day of the month. Go ahead . . . why not allow the gastronome-in-you to partake of as many August food holidays as you dare to.

National Mustard Day: The First Saturday
August 1: National Raspberry Cream Pie Day
August 2: National Ice Cream Sandwich Day
August 3: National Watermelon Day
August 3: Grab Some Nuts Day (pecans, walnuts, not the other kind)
August 4: National Lasagnas Day (Americanized to Lasagna)
August 5: National Waffle Day
August 5: National Oyster Day
August 6: National Root Beer Float Day
August 7: National Raspberries in Cream Day (Fresh or Raspberry Ice  Cream)
August 8: National Zucchini Day
August 8: National Frozen Custard Day
August 9: National Rice Pudding Day
August 10: National Banana Split Day
August 10: National “S’Mores Day”
August 11: National Raspberry Tart Day
August 12: Julienne Fries Day
August 13: National Filet Mignon Day
August 14: National “Creamsickle Day”
August 15: Lemon Meringue Pie Day
August 16: Bratwurst Day
August 16: National Rum Day
August 17: National Vanilla Custard Day
August 18: National Soft Ice Cream Day
August 19: Potato Day
August 19: Hot & Spicy Food Day
August 20: Lemonade Day
August 20: National Chocolate Pecan Pie Day
August 21: National Pecan Torte Day
August 22: National Spumoni Day
August 22: Eat a Peach Day
August 23: National Sponge Cake Day
August 24: National Peach Pie Day
August 25: Whiskey Sour Day
August 26: National Cherry Popsicle Day
August 27: National Pots de Crème Day
August 27: Banana Lover’s Day
August 28: National Cherry Turnover Day
August 29: More Herbs, Less Salt Day
August 29: Chop Suey Day
August 29: Lemon Juice Day
August 30: National Toasted Marshmallow Day
August 31: Eat Outside Day
August 31: National Trail Mix Day

How can you celebrate a food holiday? Food celebrations are as simple or as elaborate as you want them to be. Learn about a food you didn’t know a lot about . . . Try a new recipe and make something special for a loved-one or co-worker . . . . Attend a related festival, farmers market, or restaurant.  The most important thing to do is – eat good and have fun!

The Golden Cadillac Drink, created at Poor Red’s

31 Jul


Poor Red’s, Home of The Golden Cadillac

After a fun day of riding my motorcycle in the local hills with my wife, we like to stop by a small historic western tavern in the town of El Dorado called Poor Red’s where we enjoy a nice cold drink after a day out riding in the summer heat.  www.poorredsbbq.com

Poor Red’s is a small restaurant and bar off the beaten path where stepping inside the door is like stepping back in time.  It’s truly one of a kind, a must see place.  I wonder if Guy Fieri knows about it?

Poor Red’s is famous for their award winning BBQ, and also for a world famous drink they concocted called The Golden Cadillac.  This drink tastes so good it’s like having a vanilla shake, but you can never drink it fast because you’ll get a brain freeze.

The sweet after-dinner type drink is made with the Italian liquer Galliano and a few other items (recipe below).  The Golden Cadillac drink made Poor Red’s the largest consumer of Galliano in the world.  That’s huge for such a small place, world’s largest consumer! right there in the tiny town of El Dorado, so far away from Italy.

If you can’t make it over to Poor Red’s, here’s the recipe for

The Golden Cadillac

- Ice
- Heavy Cream
- White Creme de Cacao
- Galliano

In a blender with the motor on high blend 5 ice cubes, crushed, 3 tablespoons heavy cream, and 1 ounce each of white crème de cacao and Galliano for 15 seconds, or until the mixture is smooth, and pour the mixture into a chilled saucer-shaped Champagne glass. Makes 1 drink.

The Game-Changing Cookbook

15 Feb

Nathan Myhrvold’s 2,400-page ‘Modernist Cuisine’ upends everything you thought you knew about cooking

Here’s the recipe for the most astonishing cookbook of our time: Take one multimillionaire computer genius, a team of 36 researchers, chefs and editors and a laboratory specially built for cooking experiments. After nearly four years of obsessive research, assemble 2,400 pages of results into a 47-pound, six-volume collection that costs $625 and requires four pounds of ink to print.

To call inventor Nathan Myhrvold’s “Modernist Cuisine: The Art & Science of Cooking,” on sale next month, a “cookbook” is akin to calling James Joyce’s “Ulysses” “a story.” The book is a large-scale investigation into the math, science and physics behind cooking tasks from making juicy and crisp beer-can chicken to coating a foie-gras bonbon in sour cherry gel. There is precedent in this genre—science writer Harold McGee has published popular books explaining kitchen science, and chefs Thomas Keller and Ferran Adrià have written about sous vide and other techniques of avant-garde gastronomy—but nothing reaches the scope and magnitude of Mr. Myhrvold’s book. While it will likely appeal to professional chefs, within its pages are insights that even the humblest home cooks can use to improve their meals. The book puts traditional cooking wisdom under scientific scrutiny, destroying old assumptions and creating new cooking approaches.

The man behind the tome is a former chief technology officer for Microsoft and an inventor of hundreds of patents (he invented an electromagnetic car engine and is seeking a patent for his French fries treated with starch and placed in an ultrasonic bath). Though many of Mr. Myhrvold’s 51 years have been devoted to math and science—by the age of 23, he held two master’s degrees and a doctorate in mathematical physics from Princeton—in the 1990s, his passion for food began to loom large. First, he got deeply into barbecue (he was on the “team of the year” at the Memphis World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest in 1991), and then moved onto haute cuisine.

“My career at Microsoft really was getting in the way of my cooking,” said Mr. Myhrvold. After leaving Microsoft in 1999, he launched Intellectual Ventures, an invention and patent firm, and in 2007, with help from two young, scientifically-minded chefs, Chris Young and Maxime Bilet, he began work on the book. When publishers balked over the size and scope of the project, Mr. Myhrvold said, he ditched the conventional route and decided to self-publish through his publishing company, the Cooking Lab.

Among the book’s revelations: Expensive pots and pans are a waste of money. Organic food is no healthier than non-organic. Black coffee cools off faster than coffee with cream.

http://modernistcuisine.com/

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