Tag Archives: chef

Prix Fixe at Back Wine Bar and Bistro

6 Oct

Back Bistro, 25075 Blue Ravine Rd. #160, Folsom

Last week my better half, Mrs Burrell, and I tried out the new Prix Fixe Tuesday menu at Back Wine Bar and Bistro and we had a great time enjoying some very delicious culinary creations.  Every thing we had was perfection, we highly recommend trying Back Wine Bar and Bistro very soon.

September Prix Fixe Tuesday Menu (with photos below),

Course 1 consisted of Homemade gnochi puttanesca with tomato, capers, olives, garlic, tomato and oregano.
We really enjoyed the rich bold flavors of this appetizer.

Course 2 - we enjoyed pan roasted true code with prawn nantua sauce, roasted fingerling potatoes and sauteed spinach. The fish was cooked to perfection, outstanding.  The sauce was absolutely amazing and very flavorful.

Course 3 – Vanilla creme brulee with fresh whipped cream and local pears.  This is one of my all time favorite deserts and it is made 100% perfect here, it also goes very well with a nice glass of 20 year tawny port.

This is a really great deal for some really great gourmet food.  Check them out at http://www.backwinebar.com/index.htm

Filleting Salmon

7 Aug

While at Costco yesterday we were looking to buy some salmon.  They have farm fillets, wild fillets and to our surprise they had whole salmon for $4.99 a pound.  We decided to get the whole salmon and I would fillet it myself.

This is about the biggest fish I’ve purchased and I figured I would fillet it and smoke half and save the other half for grilling etc.

This was my first time filleting a salmon and I think I did ok.  Made two very nice fillets and managed to get all the ribs and pin bones out a-ok.  Even manged to scrape the bones and get a cup of meat for the cats to enjoy, they went nuts over the fresh salmon bits.

The whole salmon at Costco


Ready to begin filleting


The carnage aftermath


Two nice fillets

Folsom’s “other” Farmers Market

30 Jul


Folsom’s Farmers Markets

The best fruits and vegetables are often not found at the grocery store, instead they can be found at local Farmers Markets, and Folsom is fortunate to have not one, but two!

Friday I went and checked out Folsom’s “other” Farmers Market that is run by the The El Dorado County Certified Farmers Market Association 8 a.m. to noon on Fridays, June 4, through Oct. 1, at Briggs Ranch Plaza in Folsom.

Featured market items include fresh fruits and vegetables, honey, berries, jam, olive oil, herbs, baked goods, flowers and local merchants.  There are about 20 vendors at any given time that participate in this Farmers Market making for a very nice variety of vendors. 

On this trip I purchased some freshly picked tomatoes, some baked garlic peas that were a gourmet snack, several very nice cheeses, and some candied walnuts. I also purchased some zucchini for a ratatouille recipe I planned to make over the weekend.

In case you haven’t been yet, Folsom’s original certified Sutter Street Farmers Market runs from 8 a.m. to noon on Sundays, June 13, through October 3, in the 900 block of Sutter Street. (http://folsomfoodie.com/2011/03/13/shopping-locally-at-a-farmers-market/)

Check out both Farmers Markets, support our local farmers.

Grown locally, sold locally and eaten locally is the unofficial motto of regional agriculture boosters.

The Game-Changing Cookbook

15 Feb

Nathan Myhrvold’s 2,400-page ‘Modernist Cuisine’ upends everything you thought you knew about cooking

Here’s the recipe for the most astonishing cookbook of our time: Take one multimillionaire computer genius, a team of 36 researchers, chefs and editors and a laboratory specially built for cooking experiments. After nearly four years of obsessive research, assemble 2,400 pages of results into a 47-pound, six-volume collection that costs $625 and requires four pounds of ink to print.

To call inventor Nathan Myhrvold’s “Modernist Cuisine: The Art & Science of Cooking,” on sale next month, a “cookbook” is akin to calling James Joyce’s “Ulysses” “a story.” The book is a large-scale investigation into the math, science and physics behind cooking tasks from making juicy and crisp beer-can chicken to coating a foie-gras bonbon in sour cherry gel. There is precedent in this genre—science writer Harold McGee has published popular books explaining kitchen science, and chefs Thomas Keller and Ferran Adrià have written about sous vide and other techniques of avant-garde gastronomy—but nothing reaches the scope and magnitude of Mr. Myhrvold’s book. While it will likely appeal to professional chefs, within its pages are insights that even the humblest home cooks can use to improve their meals. The book puts traditional cooking wisdom under scientific scrutiny, destroying old assumptions and creating new cooking approaches.

The man behind the tome is a former chief technology officer for Microsoft and an inventor of hundreds of patents (he invented an electromagnetic car engine and is seeking a patent for his French fries treated with starch and placed in an ultrasonic bath). Though many of Mr. Myhrvold’s 51 years have been devoted to math and science—by the age of 23, he held two master’s degrees and a doctorate in mathematical physics from Princeton—in the 1990s, his passion for food began to loom large. First, he got deeply into barbecue (he was on the “team of the year” at the Memphis World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest in 1991), and then moved onto haute cuisine.

“My career at Microsoft really was getting in the way of my cooking,” said Mr. Myhrvold. After leaving Microsoft in 1999, he launched Intellectual Ventures, an invention and patent firm, and in 2007, with help from two young, scientifically-minded chefs, Chris Young and Maxime Bilet, he began work on the book. When publishers balked over the size and scope of the project, Mr. Myhrvold said, he ditched the conventional route and decided to self-publish through his publishing company, the Cooking Lab.

Among the book’s revelations: Expensive pots and pans are a waste of money. Organic food is no healthier than non-organic. Black coffee cools off faster than coffee with cream.

http://modernistcuisine.com/

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